Layered Elements: Reclaiming World Wide, Wastebased and Passive Technologies to Fight Malaria

Publication (Conference Paper)

Malaria is one of the worst diseases in the world. The human affliction and economic expenses to prevent and treat it are huge. According to The World Malaria Report 2012 published by
the World Health Organization, there were 219 million cases of malaria and 660,000 deaths in 2010. In 2011, almost half of the population of the world was at risk of contracting the disease and 90% of deaths occurred in the African Region, where children and pregnant women are the most affected. Even though it is estimated that 1.1 million deaths were averted during the past decade, the funding to fight the disease still falls short to achieve the global objectives established by the Millennium Development Goals initiative. According to the report, “it is estimated that $5.1 billion will be needed every year between 2011 and 2020 to achieve universal access to malaria interventions” (WHO, 2012). Strategies to control the disease are twofold: prevention and case management, and the built environment plays a major role in the first one. This is especially critical in areas with limited resource availability and prone to massive mosquito reproduction due to poor waste disposal and water drainage systems - such as slums. Processes of recollecting, reusing, recycling and reclaiming of locally discarded waste and materials appear thus as primary strategies for retrofitting such environments. This article explores the spatial and holistic solutions proposed by a multidisciplinary design team for 24 informal housing units in the community of Minkoaméyos in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The design makes use of passive, low-tech and waste-based technologies and materials as it assembles an inventory of options that could be implemented with little investment by the community itself.

TitleLayered Elements: Reclaiming World Wide, Wastebased and Passive Technologies to Fight Malaria
Publication TypeConference Paper
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsQuiros, Luis
Conference NameR+R 2013 Reclaim and Remake International Symposium
Date Published04/2013
Conference LocationWashington, DC
Abstract

Malaria is one of the worst diseases in the world. The human affliction and economic expenses to prevent and treat it are huge. According to The World Malaria Report 2012 published by
the World Health Organization, there were 219 million cases of malaria and 660,000 deaths in 2010. In 2011, almost half of the population of the world was at risk of contracting the disease and 90% of deaths occurred in the African Region, where children and pregnant women are the most affected. Even though it is estimated that 1.1 million deaths were averted during the past decade, the funding to fight the disease still falls short to achieve the global objectives established by the Millennium Development Goals initiative. According to the report, “it is estimated that $5.1 billion will be needed every year between 2011 and 2020 to achieve universal access to malaria interventions” (WHO, 2012). Strategies to control the disease are twofold: prevention and case management, and the built environment plays a major role in the first one. This is especially critical in areas with limited resource availability and prone to massive mosquito reproduction due to poor waste disposal and water drainage systems - such as slums. Processes of recollecting, reusing, recycling and reclaiming of locally discarded waste and materials appear thus as primary strategies for retrofitting such environments. This article explores the spatial and holistic solutions proposed by a multidisciplinary design team for 24 informal housing units in the community of Minkoaméyos in Yaoundé, Cameroon. The design makes use of passive, low-tech and waste-based technologies and materials as it assembles an inventory of options that could be implemented with little investment by the community itself.